Astronomical Instruments

Need the Sun, other stars or the Moon to be used. Among them: astrolabes, nocturlabes, sundials

Astronomical Instruments There are 17 products.

Astronomical Instruments

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Showing 1 - 12 of 17 items
  • Although known as the astronomical ring, it is principally employed as an ecuatorial solar universal quadrant. Its use was widespread during 18th century.  It is composed of a ring that can be adjusted to various latitudes, a meridian ring showing the latitude scale, a moveable hour ring and a central, grooved bar that is graduated for the months of the...

  • This instrument is a reproduction of the Nautical Astrolabe called of “Valence” for the Irish island it was found, and belonged to the Armee of Philipe II (16th century).  It´s placed in the National Maritime Museum of Greenwich and the replica used is in the Naval Museum of Madrid.  The nautical astrolabe is a simplification of the planispherical or...

  • This nocturnal watch ––horologium nocturnale–  is an astronomical instrument used to measure the time through the observation of the Pole Star and the position of brigth stars in the celestial sphere.  This nocturnal is a reproduction of the one made in 1570 by Girolamo della Volpaia  (currently at the Galileo Museum in Florence, former History of...

  • This instrument is really a reproduction of an Octant of the mid-17th century. By semi-accurately measuring the height of stars or the sun, the Octant allows navigants to determine geographic latitude. In 1731 John Hadley (England) and Thomas Godfrey (Philadelfia, U.S.A.), demonstrated the Octant, independently. The arc of an Octant is 45º or 1/8 of a...

  • This model is a reproduction of a mobile cubic quadrant that dates back to 1736, and is thought to be the invention of David Beringer of Hapsburg (Germany). It is made up of an articulated arm, which allows us to incline the cube in a North-South direction, and a plumb line on the Eastern side that moves along a latitudes´graduated scale which allows to...

  • Only perpetual calendars meet the basic condition to permit the deduction of any essential data from any other data (year, month, week and day). However, all the analog perpetual calendars known are hardly perpetual since the limit of their calculations is about 50 years.  Our calendar starts at January 1, 1600, and ends at December 31, 2799. It is based...

  • The name is derived from the best known version of this solar clock, in which the path of the pearl in both tropics traces two lines that resemble the hood of Capuchin monks.The quadrant goes back to the 15th century, although the date is not precise. This model is a sea-going, local-hour quadrant of a type called a clinometer. It is a reproduction and...

  • This dial of German origin is an Universal sundial like the Beringer quadrant. It also has a moveable scale of latitudes to be set for the measure.  Equinoctial sundial, known as “Augsburg clock”. The original was made by Iohann Georg Vogler (1720-1765) who belonged to the fourth generation of a legendary line of goldsmiths in Augsburg, Germany. It is in...

  • The piece is a replica of a Nocturnal and Tide Computer from 1570, signed by Humphrey Cole. It is one of the first BritishRenaissance´ instruments.The original can be found in the British Museum, London. One of its faces is a Nocturnal and the other is a Tide Computer. The Nocturnal or star clock is an artifact that is used to obtain the time at night...

  • The name "astrolabe" comes from the Greek word astro meaning star, and labio, "that which searches," so it could be translated as "star searcher." Nonetheless, this complex instrument has many other applications. After years of study and research Dr. L.H.V. has developed this Astrolabe based in Renaissance classics. Its precision and aesthetics makes of...

  • This instrument is one of the most widespread dial in the world, belonging to the class of altitude dials. It’s known as the cylindrical dial, the vertical dial, the travelling dial or more commonly, the Shepherd’s dial. The dial is finished with a rotating top with two styles or gnomons (the long one for winter and the short one for summer), both...

  • We developed this unique piece to celebrate the International Astronomical Year (2009). The astrolabe reached the peak of its popularity in the 16th century. The Spanish astronomer and mathematician Juan de Rojas presented to the European public the Orthographic Projection (1550). This projection was successfully applied in a new type of astrolabe that...

Showing 1 - 12 of 17 items