I-Basic Collection

A collection of simplified scientific instruments´ reproductions: smallest sizes or basic materials  

I-Basic Collection There are 18 products.

I-Basic Collection

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Showing 1 - 12 of 18 items
  • The Scottish mathematician John Napier (1550-1617) invented this abacus. In 1617, the year of his death, Napier published in Edinburgh a short work in Latin titled Rabdologiae, in which he dealt with products and quotients of numbers. In the book, Napier describes a series of rods which he had invented –later known as Napier’s bones– which, placed in...

  • In the 16th century the astrolabe reached the peak of its popularity. The Spanish astronomer and mathematician Juan de Rojas presented to the European public the Orthographic Projection (1550). This projection was successfully applied in a new type of astrolabe that offered remarkable advantages over its predecessors because it could be used in any...

  • From the Greek “star searcher” this instrument was introduced in Europe by the Arabs. It became a vital tool for astronomers, astrologers and surveyors. Among other calculations one can establish the height of the Sun, the planets and the stars, determine time and Latitude, measure heights, calculate distances and astrological implications. Non...

  • It is a simplified planispherical astrolabe whose final shape came as a result of the experience of navigators. By measuring the altitude of the stars you obtain the Latitude. This Portuguese marine astrolabe (1550-55) was owned by a Dundee skipper, A. Smyton. The original is at the Art Gallery and Museum of Dundee, Scotland. Non functional item....

  • To keep time at night, man learned by observing the stars: certain boreal constellations rotated around the Pole Star about once per day, as if a giant clock hand were keeping time around a celestial sphere of 24 hours. This European Horologium noctis was made in the mid-17th century. Non functional item. Available on brass or silver plated, please...

  • Known as the Astronomic Ring Dial Annulus Astronomicus , the complete name of this instrument is the Universal Equinoctial Ring Sundial. It works on the same principle as the Universal Equatorial Solar Quadrant. This portable instrument can be used to make astronomical measurements and tell time in all Latitudes. Non functional item. Available on brass...

  • This vertical disc dial has two sides: an altitude sundial and a perpetual calendar, which is the one depicted.  The calendar consists of three rotatable discs set on top of the main disc with a date scale and a lunar age scale among other features. Made in France (1650-1700), is at the National Maritime Museum, London. Non functional item. Available...

  • French portable horizontal dial (circa 1800), shell-shaped, was made for 50º latitude. On the hour scale, the hour lines radiate from the Sun’s face. In the center, there was a circular hole for the missing gnomon. The original, made of copper, is at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London. Non functional item. Available on brass or silver...

  • Portable altitude dial, signed by the French mathematician Oronce Finé, 1524. It was called because of its shape resembling a small ship, “Navicula from Veneto”. Its fanciful appearance does not affect in any way its conceptual rigor and relates it to the Regiomontanus quadrant.  The original is at the Poldi Pezzoli Museum, Milan. Non functional item....

  • H105 Rojas´Astrolabe *In the 16th century the astrolabe reached the peak of its popularity. The Spanish astronomer and mathematician Juan de Rojas presented to the European public the Orthographic Projection (1550). This projection was successfully applied in a new type of astrolabe that offered remarkable advantages over its predecessors because it...

  • H109 Astronomic Ring Dial *Known as the Astronomic Ring Dial Annulus Astronomicus , the complete name of this instrument is the Universal Equinoctial Ring Sundial. It works on the same principle as the Universal Equatorial Solar Quadrant. This portable instrument can be used to make astronomical measurements and tell time in all Latitudes.   H111...

  • H106  Planisferic Astrolabe *From the Greek “star searcher” the astrolabe was introduced in Europe by the Arabs. It became a vital tool for astronomers, astrologers and surveyors. Among other calculations one can establish the height of the Sun, the planets and the stars, determine time and Latitude, measure heights, calculate distances and astrological...

Showing 1 - 12 of 18 items