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  • From first scientific toys that used animated images to modern movies, retinal persistence has been fundamental to fooling the mind into believing that a series of static images are in motion. In 1834, the English mathematician George Horner proposed a practical apparatus based on the phenakistoscope of Plateau and Stampfer (1830). It eliminated the need...

  • This scientific toy with animated images also relies in retinal persistence to make us believe we are seeing images in motion. The praxinoscope was patented by the Frenchman Emile Reynaud in 1877, who was looking to overcome the deficiencies of the zoetrope, the most popular at the time. His apparatus was the first to eliminate the distorted view of the...

  • This scientific toy with animated images also relies in retinal persistence to make us believe we are seeing images in motion. The praxinoscope was patented by the Frenchman Emile Reynaud in 1877, who was looking to overcome the deficiencies of the zoetrope, the most popular at the time. His apparatus was the first to eliminate the distorted view of the...

  • This piece is a sundial for prayers/mass hour. The original jewel, probably made on the 10th century, was found at Canterbury Cathedral, UK.  The dial was updated for London’s   latitude 50º. The dial must be hanged, facing the sun to find the hours like any other altitude sundial, introducing the little bar on the corresponding Month´s hole....

  • The Scottish mathematician John Napier (1550-1617) invented this abacus. In 1617, the year of his death, Napier published in Edinburgh a short work in Latin titled Rabdologiae, in which he dealt with products and quotients of numbers. In the book, Napier describes a series of rods which he had invented –later known as Napier’s bones– which, placed in...

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 items